The FastDay Forum

Getting Sweaty! Exercise & Fitness

19 posts Page 1 of 2
I wasn't sure whether to post this or not . . . but I have just decided to start running again after several years' break, due to some injuries, feeling too old, etc. I ran Monday and Tuesday for a half hour, a mini loop around the neighborhood. Today, I have aches in muscles I didn't even know I had - but of course I am using muscles not used in ages. My brain thinks I am still 40 but, of course, my body knows I am definitely NOT. I am taking a couple of days' break, but will try and get back to it again by Friday. So this article caught my attention. What are some of your comments and opinions?

http://www.vox.com/2015/8/4/9091093/wal ... us-running
Oh boy, do I know about the injuries! But… I love running and I miss it. Walking is better than nothing, but for optimal health, you really need to get your heart rate up.

That's so cool that you've started running again. Can I make a suggestion to you? Don't run on back to back days. Take some time off from this high impact exercise to allow for recovery. Maybe do strength training or something on the off days.
Thanks @MaryAnn, that makes a lot of sense !!!
I re-started running 3 weeks ago after almost a three year break due to a constant hip injury because I got bored with walking. I'm using an app called Easy 5k from Jeff Galloway. Even though I can run further than he is suggesting in the early days, I have started right back from the beginning and so far I have no injuries apart from a little stiffness. Only 3 days a week of running required http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/5k10kschedules/. Good luck :clover:
I envy you as I can't run to save my life and never could. Each time I tried, even when I was in school, I always felt like my legs were wearing a ton and, with a lot of past injuries in the knees and ankles, I couldn't try again. Walking, on the other hand, bore me when not done in the right conditions like a beautiful landscape or in the montains. However, I walk every day at least 30 minutes, thanks to my dog.

I agree that the best exercise is the one you'll do. If it's a chore and there's no pleasure or at least satisfaction, one will more easily find excuses to stop doing it and, like on the WOE, the key is regularity so, the best way, I think, is to find something one's really like to do, whatever it is.
My best friend (who is 2'' shorter than me) uses a treadmill to run, but really she is using it because of a stressful job than for health reasons and she pounds away for over 2 hours at least four times a week - work permitting. When she comes to Cyprus on holiday she goes running outdoors every morning and night. However I can only manage a brisk 30 walk (or just a stroll) most days depending on my breathing problems. Unable to do any form of aerobic exercise due to extreme shortness of breath - walking up 10 stairs just about finishes me off ! So here are two extremes of people who do what suits them. However, we eat a completely different diet and I weigh 118 lbs and she weighs 178 - 192 lbs as she believes she needs a lot of pasta and other starched based meals in order to keep up her energy to run.
I meant to say also, I really enjoy Julia Belluz's health articles at vox.com. She's really good at wading through a lot of conflicting scientific research and summarizing it succinctly and intelligently.
lovemyparrot wrote: I wasn't sure whether to post this or not . . . but I have just decided to start running again after several years' break, due to some injuries, feeling too old, etc. I ran Monday and Tuesday for a half hour, a mini loop around the neighborhood. Today, I have aches in muscles I didn't even know I had - but of course I am using muscles not used in ages. My brain thinks I am still 40 but, of course, my body knows I am definitely NOT. I am taking a couple of days' break, but will try and get back to it again by Friday. So this article caught my attention. What are some of your comments and opinions?

http://www.vox.com/2015/8/4/9091093/wal ... us-running


Take it gently, using a walk run app/programme will be beneficial. You will get injuries if not. Get some really good trainers, stretch out afterwards and enjoy yourself.
I took up running in my late 20s fired up by Ken Coopers "Aerobics" book. Never got as far as racing - overdid it as was my wont, swollen ankles, stopped. Started again a couple of years ago at 60, more cautiously, obviously slower, still no urge to do races, but my legs and feet are not suffering, because I made myself some rules ...

I built up by finding a route of just over 4 miles. I always walk to the "start line", which takes 3 or 4 minutes. I do not do headphones, so began by counting paces. Every time my left foot hits the ground counts as one. In the beginning it was run one hundred, walk one hundred - both the running and the walking could be slow while I recovered my breath, if the running is uphill, so be it, if a walking stretch is downhill then walk it; do not pound down hills to compensate for pathetic ups, your legs won't take it.

Alternate day training, or 4:3, never 2 days in a row. After a month or so, change the walk/run ratio to 100/120, a few weeks later to 100/140 and so on until the walking is eliminated (in theory :lol: , now I can sometimes run 6 or 7 miles straight, and sometimes I take walk breaks on even my shortest route. For variety I will go on a longer route fully expecting to walk quite a bit on the later parts)

I also find that off-road walking (in Walking boots, hills a bonus), strengthens the muscles and all the little tendons and ligaments so that this time round there are no lasting aches and pains.
:?: Quick answer: YES!
Walk or run, fast or slow. And/or do zumba, swim, bike. Row! Just get yourself out the door and do it! :wink:
Change it up so you don't get bored or injured. :grin: Have fun!
I'm afraid I really hate running; I enjoy walking, but LOVE dancing, hence the dance meetup I've been going to the last few months. Unfortunately, that will be on hiatus for a month, this Saturday being the last one till late September. :cry:

I have a book "Walking: A Complete Guide to the Complete Exercise" by Casey Meyers; he was a runner, but switched due to injury. He goes into detail about form and fast/race walking and how to challenge yourself, not just stroll.
Thank you for posting this question. Great answers already. Agree that the short answer is...do what you enjoy!
Like @rawkaren, I laid off running after recurring hip flare-ups. But then I missed it. I also love long walks and hope to incorporate walking the 4 miles home from work a couple times a week once the oppressive heat of NYC summer subsides :dazed:
I started up again by revisiting the Couch to 5k program (C25k) and have an app on my phone from Zen Labs.
Every other day is good advice. Incorporate walk intervals.
Personally (and I mean this only for myself) I think I will feel better out there once I remove some of this weight. I believe my hip will thank me. Meanwhile, I just enjoy being out there again and getting the head-clearing benefits of more intense cardio.
Barbarita's description and advice for transitioning from walking to running is perfect!

My suggestion is to consider doing both: a walk one day, a run the next. This makes the walk days an active recovery for the run days - moving similar muscles but with very little strain.

If you think about it, the one thing that adults almost never do as adults - is jump. And running is much like a series of one-legged jumps that also require considerable balance. With that in mind, it's no wonder joints and muscles get achy when starting out!
I thought the people in this thread might be interested in this article on choosing the right running shoes: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/0 ... pe=article
Thanks everyone for a lot of good advice - I really appreciate it. Off for a short run tomorrow, and I think I will follow the suggestions given by @Barbarita.
19 posts Page 1 of 2
Similar Topics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

START THE 5:2 DIET WITH HELP FROM FASTDAY

Be healthier. Lose weight. Eat the foods you love, most of the time.

Learn about the 5:2 diet

LEARN ABOUT FASTING
We've got loads of info about intermittent fasting, written in a way which is easy to understand. Whether you're wondering about side effects or why the scales aren't budging, we've got all you need to know.

Your intermittent fasting questions answered ASK QUESTIONS & GET SUPPORT
Come along to the FastDay Forum, we're a friendly bunch and happy to answer your fasting questions and offer support. Why not join in one of our regular challenges to help you towards your goal weight?

Use our free 5:2 diet tracker FREE 5:2 DIET PROGRESS TRACKER & BLOG
Tracking your diet progress is great for staying motivated. Chart your measurements and keep tabs on your daily calorie needs. You can even create a free blog to journal your 5:2 experience!

cron