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Has anyone had a read of this book yet? There is research going on at Newcastle University with Professor Roy Taylor with interesting results in reversing Type 2 Diabetes by doing an 800 calorie per day diet for 8 weeks:
"Eight weeks using the diet helped those who took part to lose weight and reduced the amount of fat in their liver and pancreas. Doing so helped to restore their insulin production and put their Type 2 diabetes into remission. Three months later, some had put weight back on, but most still had normal blood glucose control." (from Diabetes UK website)

Michael Mosely suggests maintaining the weight loss afterwards using 5:2 (but at the 800 cal level rather than 500/600). It peaked my interest because, although I am not diabetic or pre-diabetic, all my fat is abdominal so I'm a prime candidate for it in the future (plus it is in my family). Worth a peak.
Thanks Thursday. I have not read the book yet. Not new but it's good to see this profiled in the guardian today http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35280028 :smile:
Tuesday wrote: Has anyone had a read of this book yet? There is research going on at Newcastle University with Professor Roy Taylor with interesting results in reversing Type 2 Diabetes by doing an 800 calorie per day diet for 8 weeks:
"Eight weeks using the diet helped those who took part to lose weight and reduced the amount of fat in their liver and pancreas. Doing so helped to restore their insulin production and put their Type 2 diabetes into remission. Three months later, some had put weight back on, but most still had normal blood glucose control." (from Diabetes UK website)

Michael Mosely suggests maintaining the weight loss afterwards using 5:2 (but at the 800 cal level rather than 500/600). It peaked my interest because, although I am not diabetic or pre-diabetic, all my fat is abdominal so I'm a prime candidate for it in the future (plus it is in my family). Worth a peak.


Hello,
I know Michael Mosley. He is the most famous human-health guinea and also BBC journalist. I do read his blogs but haven’t read his blood sugar diet book yet though I have heard about it.
Michael Mosley’s words always peek my interest and it’s really motivating. He always put focus on the diet we eat which is actually important to consider. Because whatever we eat eventually shows up on our face and simultaneously help us from internally.

And I also read in one of his blog saying that exercise is bad form of weight loss. He focuses on compensatory eating and relaxing though he also says, it does not mean we shouldn’t exercise.
I appreciate his ways of digging into facts and implementing things which is unaware from many.
He says real benefits are the effect exercise has on insulin sensitivity and aerobic fitness.

Aerobic fitness does come under physical activity which I am also following for long time. My personal trainer helps me in it. I was also suffering from high blood sugar That’s why I get into aerobic fitness. And, I was boosted up more when it was recommended by Michael Mosley too. I want to maintain my blood sugar So; I will definitely read his book too.

Regards.
Jean
Hi @Tuesday
On a similar note the article below - about the theories of a Harvard obesity expert - discusses changing the types of food we eat to help combat diabetes. Lots of information we have read before - lower carbs, eat good fats, etc.
http://www.theage.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/fat-fertilisers-why-overeating-is-not-making-you-fat-20160112-gm3xuh.html
"Cutting back on calories won't do it. That doesn't change biology. To change biology, you have to change the kinds of foods you're eating."
@Tuesday, I came across the book at the weekend and downloaded it onto tmy kindle and have just started reading it. However my heart sunk when I read it was a very low calorie diet but I perked up again when I read it was for eight weeks...I guess I'll just have to keep reading on. I am like you I have a large pot belly and my mother is diabetic and I also watched my father in law die from the effects of diabetes/obesity.
Wow, that's a low amount of calories! What do you think, [tag]Carorees[/tag[?
@carorees
While caro is sleeping...

Both US and UK Amazons are currently useless regarding viewing book contents - having only a cover photo. US availability for this book won't happen until March 22.

Searching for Roy Taylor and Diabetes UK yielded the following related links:

https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Research/Re ... quid-diet/

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/di ... versal.htm

And above link contains a PDF link (below) that answers the "800 calorie for 8 weeks seems very low..." question:

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/di ... e%2015.pdf

Which states:

"The particular diet used in the study was designed to mimic the sudden reduction of calorie intake that occurs after gastric bypass surgery."
I know someone who has brought his blood glucose levels under control by restricting his calorie intake in this way- not through soups and shakes, but through real food. He still has to be careful, but has avoided the need for medication for four years,
The problem is we had a rule against recommending very low calorie diets for more than 36 hours at a pop without a doctor's supervision and I need to know if @Carorees and/or @Moogie thinks this is ok. I'm not sure we ever actually defined "very low calorie" -- with a name like ours, we need to be careful that we are not promoting anorexia.
The reason we don't allow discussion of fasting/very low calorie diets for more than 3 days is because of the phenomenon of refeeding syndrome

Refeeding syndrome is the potentially fatal shifts in fluids and electrolytes that may occur in malnourished people. The underlying cause is the metabolic and hormonal changes caused by rapid refeeding, During the period of prolonged starvation, several intracellular minerals become severely depleted. During refeeding, the increase in blood sugar leads to increased insulin and decreased secretion of glucagon. Insulin stimulates glycogen, fat, and protein synthesis. This process requires minerals such as phosphate and magnesium and potassium be moved into the cells. These processes result in a decrease in the serum levels of phosphate, potassium, and magnesium, all of which are already depleted, and this also causes water to move with them. This drop in electrolytes can be fatal. If the refeeding process avoids carbs and particularly high GI foods, refeeding syndrome is much less likely to happen. Also ensuring that electrolyte intake is high during the fasting/very low calorie period.

Although refeeding syndrome is a significant risk in long-term fasting, malnourishment or starvation, it is not unknown after as little as 5 days of very low calorie intake. This is very rare but we chose to set 3 days as our limit for safety reasons.

So, an 800 calorie diet for some weeks if properly done with attention to good nutrition from the 800 calories ensuring good electrolyte intake, and with sensible reintroduction of a higher calorie intake is likely to be perfectly safe, but from the forum admin point of view, we should not be promoting 800 calories for extended periods as we can't ensure that anyone who chooses to follow it will not be at risk of refeeding syndrome.

I hope that makes sense.
This sounds intriguing...but I'm concerned about following up such a strict program with 5.2, that one might fall victim to famine reaction and have problems with excessive hunger. Sigh. And just because it works for actual diabetics, doesn't mean it's equally good for those not diabetic. I'm also concerned about the mindset of "trying something new" that's part of the diet mentality, which I'm trying to leave behind. Yes, I'd like to lose more weight, but want to remember why I'd abandoned other weight loss methods before starting 5.2; been there, done that, don't want to go through that again. I might read the book, but am not convinced this is something I want to do.
Surely the whole idea of the Newcastle work was to offer those with . or at serious risk of developing , type 2 diabetes strategies to manage their condition. I find it worrying that people might be looking at this as simply part of a weight loss strategy.

This was a very serious business for my friend who faced a lifetime of medication which might not have guaranteed that he was free of medical complications which accompany diabetes. The Newcastle regime worked for him, but he still has to pay very careful attention to his intake of carbohydrates in order to keep his blood glucose levels within reasonable limits.
DAILY MAIL NEWSPAPER (UK) Adapted from The Eight-Week Blood Sugar Diet: Lose Weight Fast And Reprogramme Your Body by Michael Mosley (Short Books, £8.99). © Michael Mosley 2016.

Eat to beat diabetes: As millions of Brits battle the deadly condition the creator of the 5:2 diet shows how YOU can reverse it... in just eight weeks
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... z3xXSveo3Y
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
In Monday’s Mail, I’ll explain more about how you can lose weight, improve your health and get your blood sugar under control. And all this while eating tasty and wholesome food that will keep you feeling fuller for longer. I will also explain the sort of tests and precautions you should take before starting.
Here is the link to the article in Monday's Daily Mail:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... ealth.html
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